Tuesday, 13 February 2018

Review: How to be Champion by Sarah Millican

How to be ChampionPart autobiography, part self help, part confession, part celebration of being a common-or-garden woman, part collection of synonyms for nunny, Sarah Millican's debut book delves into her super normal life with daft stories, funny tales and proper advice on how to get past life's blips - like being good at school but not good at friends, the excitement of IBS and how to blossom post divorce.

If you've ever worn glasses at the age of six, worn an off-the-shoulder gown with no confidence, been contacted by an old school bully, lived in your childhood bedroom in your thirties, been gloriously dumped in a Frankie and Benny's, cried so much you felt great, been for a romantic walk with a dog, worn leggings two days in a row even though they smelt of wee from a distance, then This Is Your Book. If you haven't done those things but wish you had, This Is Your Book. If you just want to laugh on a train/sofa/toilet or under your desk at work, This Is Your Book.

Shona's review 5 of 5 stars

If you know me then you probably know I'm a fan of Sarah Millican. I love her honest down to earth comedy. When i saw that she had released this book I was really keen to get my hands on it, but torn because I'd quite like to listen to her reading it to me (hello audio book). So I quickly purchased it via audible, and then was overjoyed to receive a hardback copy for Christmas from my lovely husband. Now i could enjoy the feel of a proper book in my hand, and have Millicans dulcet tones in my ear whenever i had time to pick it up and read/hear a snippet. And that is how I have read/listened to this book. One chapter at a time.

Each chapter is an essay of sorts. An intimate peek in to a moment in Millicans life, some chapters are a little more light hearted than others, but every chapter has a How to be Champion section at the end. A reminder that sometimes you just need to be true to yourself, that superheroes wear glasses, and holidays don't have to be expensive.

This would have been a great book to have as a teenager, infact its one i will recommend my teenage daughters read because there are messages in there for all of us, even if our dad wasn't a miner, or we didn't wear glasses. The message is strong, live your best life, be happy, be champion.